July 7, 2011

Present: Bill, Karen, Jocelyn, Brynja, Betul, Pedro, Dave, Vicki, Tom, Mary, Bushra

Agenda
  1. Check in -- what have we accomplished? What concerns/issues come tomind? What needs to be done?
  • accomplishments:
    • good start with topic; have lots of resources to investigate
    • valuable to know which topic we are designing around
    • having the goal of all students engaged in groups during the lesson
    • know topic; have lots of resources
    • getting a good feel of lesson study
    • thinking about how our topic connects to previous and future topics

  • concerns:
    • not too much time until we teach the lesson
    • what should we be looking for as we analyze resources? strategies, methods, objectives?
    • confused about the current step as we look through resources
    • are we making connections? we need to specify the goal more specifically
    • time crunch; will we be ready for a practice run with teachers next friday?
    • would like to see a concrete timeline of what needs to get done by when
    • tasks tend to take longer than anticipated

  • suggestions:
    • make a time line
    • alter agenda to settle lesson goals and objectives first
    • shorter, in-process presentations

3. Set time line

  • 7/7 Thur
    • set time line
    • establish lesson goals and objectives
    • mini-presentations on resources
  • 7/8 Fri
    • look at lesson template from Aki (Brynja)
    • consider lesson flow (Thinking Through Lesson Protocol)
    • discuss groupworthy tasks article (Bill)
  • 7/11 Mon
    • finalize task(s)
  • 7/12 Tue
    • write lesson
    • predicting student reactions
  • 7/14 Thur
    • choose presenter
    • run through lesson
  • 7/15 Fri - TEACH PRACTICE LESSON
  • 7/18 Mon
    • tweak lesson
    • choose presenter
  • 7/19 Tue - TEACH LESSON
    • teach lesson
    • debrief lesson
    • eat ice cream
  • 7/21 Thur
    • write up report on lesson study
  • 7/22 Fri
    • present lesson study outcomes to SSTP colleagues


4. mini presentations on resources
  • Common Core
    • solving systems introduced in grade 8 and continues into high school standards
    • bulk of the standards on solving systems is in Algebra I course (appendix A); ater grades may expand to more than two variables and the use of matrix solution methods
    • in appendix A; in particular reasoning with equations and inequalities
    • focus is on represent, analyze, and solve
  • Discovering Algebra
    • can be used in traditional or constructivist manner
    • problem sets at end of sections
    • exploration/investigations in the midst of each section
    • context is finding break-even points; population comparison; races with head starts
    • varying format of the equation-- not always y = mx + b
    • include substitution and elimination methods
    • special cases with
  • Connected Mathematics Project
    • concepts are embedded in real world experiments
    • context for introduction is walking races
    • students encouraged to think about how to compare two walkers before the formal introduction of concepts and solution methods
    • multiple representations (tables, graphs)
    • analysis includes consideration of y-intercepts and interpreting the meaning thereof
  • Pearson
    • interesting story at the outset of the section
    • traditional approach
    • begins with definition, then verify whether points are solutions or not
    • graphical representations
    • special cases (parallel, overlapping, intersecting)
    • includes substitution and elimination methods
  • McDougall-Littell
    • begin with graphing lines and verifying solutions (drawing on previous sections)
    • contexts include money (monthly vs daily bus passes)
    • algebraic methods presented in rapid successsion
    • subsequent sections include three variable systems and graphing in three dimensions
  • Holt - Comparing Quantities
    • introduces concepts via real life contexts, perhaps in contrived situations
    • comparison tables as a mode of finding solutions
    • traditional algebraic representations (e.g. equations) introduced
  • College Preparatory

5. Possible objectives for the lesson
  • surface students' existing knowledge of systems and solutions
  • the uniqueness of solutions for consistent, independent
  • concept that the graph represents all the points that satisfy particular equations

6. Homework: each member drafts lesson objectives or goal